Emigration Canyon Railroad Served SLC Builders’ Needs

Becky BartholomewHistory Blazer, January 1996 In the late 1800s a building boom occurred in Salt Lake City. Concrete had not yet been developed that was strong enough to be used for building foundations, so granite and sandstone blocks were used instead. Quarries in Little Cottonwood Canyon furnished the granite. Red and white sandstone came from quarries in Emigration Canyon. Initially, heavy …

History to Go Bibliography

Published by the Utah State Historical Society: Beehive History, vol. 1-27. Salt Lake City: Utah State Historical Society. History Blazer. Salt Lake City: Utah State Historical Society, 1995-1996. Utah Historical Quarterly, vol. 1-69. Salt Lake City: Utah State Historical Society, 1928-2001. Utah Centennial County History Series. Utah State Historical Society, c. 1996. Published in Cooperation with the Utah State Historical …

State Facts Post

Utah was the 45th state to enter the United States (January 4, 1896). As of 2018 Utah has a population of approximately 3,216,857, Utah ranks as the 30th most populous state in the United States. 85% percent (2018) of the population lives along the Wasatch front (Salt Lake, Davis, Utah and Weber Counties). State Name The state of Utah is named …

State Facts Page

  Utah was the 45th state to enter the United States (January 4, 1896). Today with a population of approximately 2,233,169 (est. 2000), Utah ranks as the 34th most populous state in the United States. 76% percent (2000) of the population lives along the Wasatch front, where resources are most plentiful (Salt Lake, Davis, Utah and Weber Counties). State Name …

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Alice the Elephant: Alice was supposedly the first elephant to calve in North America. She first arrived in Salt Lake City around 1918 and resided in the Liberty Park Zoo. She was later moved to Hogle Zoo when that facility opened. American Fork: American Fork Avalanches: Geology Physical Geography of Utah Camp Floyd: The camp was built by troops sent …

Glossary of Utah Terms

Bryce Canyon National Park  Park was established in 1928 by President Hoover and is named for Ebenezer Bryce, a pioneer cattleman who homesteaded in the area. Deseret The provisional state created in 1849 by Brigham Young. The U. S. Congress eliminated it by creating the Territory of Utah in September 1850. The term comes from The Book of Mormon, an …

Utah State Symbols and Motto

Animal: Rocky Mountain Elk Bird: California Seagull Cooking Pot: Dutch Oven Emblem: Beehive Fish: Bonneville Cutthroat Trout Flag: Flag and Seal Flower: Sego Lily Folk Dance: Square Dance Fossil: Allosaurus Fruit: Cherry Gem: Topaz Grass: Indian Ricegrass Hymn: “Utah, We Love Thee ” by Evan Stephens Insect: Honey Bee Mineral: Copper Motto: “Industry Rock: Coal Song: “Utah, This is the Place” …

“This Is the Place” Monument

Tricia Smith-Mansfield Utah History Encyclopedia The “This Is the Place” Monument is located at the mouth of Emigration Canyon in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1937 a state commission comprised of representatives of various faiths selected Mahonri M. Young, a grandson of Brigham Young, to design the monument, which derives its name from the words Brigham Young is said to …

History of West Valley (“E” Center)

Jami Balls In the fall of 1848, not long after the Mormons settled Salt Lake Valley, Joseph Harker ventured west across the Jordan River. He established the first settlement on the west side of the valley and within a year seven other families joined him. The land was considered best suited for grazing since alkali and other mineral deposits tainted …

Ecker Hill: A Photographic Exhibit

The Olympic Park isn’t the first time Utah has had a world-class facility for ski jumping. Text by Roger Roper, Utah History Encyclopedia photographs from the Utah State Historical Society Just a few miles north of the present Olympic ski jump facility in Parley’s Canyon is Ecker Hill.   In the late fall of 1928, members of the fledgling Utah …